People behind the Names – Eustace Edward Faull

Eustace Edward Faull was born in Glamorgan, Wales his was the son of Joseph and Eleanor Faull. Eustace’s father Joseph would die when Eustace was just six years old, he would then go on to lose a brother and two sisters before he turned twenty six. In 1904 in Barnstaple, Eustace would marry Lois Eunice Pugsley from Mortehoe. Eustace’s wife Lois and her family lived at Landscape House, Mortehoe, the family worked at the train station which at the time was a short walk away. Lois’s parents Richard and Grace lived at Netthercott before moving to Georgeham and then to Mortehoe. Eustace left for Queensland on the 23rd January 1913 with his brother in law John Pugsley. They sailed to Sydney, Australia on-board the P&O’s Ballarat ship. The Ballarat was a steamer that left Tilbury with 1137 passengers onboard it would arrive at Sydney’s Miller’s Point at 8 o’clock on the 15th March 1913. The voyage was marked by some trying incidents. At the outset the vessel had to contend with severe head winds as far as Las Palmas, where it stopped on January 29 for provisions. Following this enroute to the Cape, an epidemic of measles broke out amongst the children on board causing chaos and distress. After leaving Capetown, where 1400 tons of coal, malts, and passengers were taken on board, still further trouble occurred. At dawn on February 27, a steward named W. F. Sankowski, 19, a German-Australian, jumped overboard.

Despite this when arriving in Australia, Captain Hanson spoke well of the class of passengers he had brought out, stating they were mostly of the agricultural, artisan and domestic classes. Eustace would sign up for war service in Brisbane, his records describe him at the time of enlistment as being occupied as a painter. He was 35 years, 11 months old, with blue eyes and having a fair complexion. Eustace saw active service in many countries. During his time at war his records show that he was given punishment for being “absent without leave for 2 days” in 1915. Later that same year he was admitted to St David’s Hospital in Malta where he was suffering with dysentry, he survived and was later moved to a home for convalescence. The Australian Red Cross Society records document that Private 357 Eustace Edward Faull was part of the 25th Battalion, he was declared Killed in Action on the 14th November 1916 after previously being reported Wounded and Missing. Lois wrote many letters enquiring about her husbands where abouts, aware that he was missing she would receive the news of his death in 1917. Some of these letters are shown below:

Dear Madam We very much regret to inform you of evidence regarding your husband – No. 357 Pte. E. E. Faull given by Lieut. Healy of the same unit, to whose brother he was batman. Lieut, Healy states that Pte. Faull was killed with his brother at Flers on November 14th 1916 and he has seen his grave on the field. He describes your husband who was a signwriter as 5’9” in height, about 40 years of age with a slight grey moustac

he. We are also informed that your husband is buried 1 mile East of Le Sars and 2.5 miles south west of Bapanme and we are applying to the graves registration bureau for a photograph of his grave which will be sent to you as soon as circumstances allow, although it may be some time before the application can be noted. Should we obtain further information about him we shall gladly advise you and trust that it will be some consolation to you to know that his grave is registered. Assuring you of our sincere sympathy in your lose.

______

January 26 1917

I am asking if you will kindly enquire as to my husband Pte Eustace E Faull 357 who was wounded on the 14th November 1918. I was informed from headquarters that he was wounded in France by no other particulars. I am most anxious as I think its quite time I heard something and should be so grateful if you will look into this for me. Yours faithfully Wife of E. E Faull

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s