Category Archives: Camping

Damage Barton Farm

It is believed that Damage Barton farm was established at some time in the twelfth century, it would be owned for many years by the Cutcliffe family. John Cutcliffe was a priest who spoke openly against the Pope and Roman Catholic religion, he was imprisoned for his views and writings. There is evidence that Damage Barton was owned by this family from 1431, being inherited throughout the family until it was eventually sold in 1922. Following the death of Charles Cutcliffe in 1745 the farm was leased to Thomas Gammon whose family farmed the land until 1811, following this the Shapland family took over the tenancy. The Bale family took over the tenancy in 1890, when the farm had to be sold to a Mr Trethewy from Bedfordshire, when he decided to sell it, the Bale family who had been tenants for over forty years bought the farm and continued to farm the land. The farm was again sold in 1957 to John Everleigh who stayed for five years before selling to Peter and Mary Lethbridge, whose family still run the farm and campsite today.

The Lethbridge Family have farmed Damage Barton since 1962. Three generations of the family now live here and run a very successful caravan and camping site. The farm itself comprises 500 acres on the coast of North Devon, and is a stock rearing beef and sheep farm. The farm grows approximately 35 acres of cereals, for its own consumption, almost enough to provide all of the farm’s straw needs, and the basis of its cereal feed. Twenty acres of swedes are used for fattening lambs. The farm produces 600 tons of silage and some hay. Peter and Mary, who bought Damage Barton in 1962 and were first generation farmers. When they bought the farm, it already had a tourism component in the form of a field used by the Caravan Club and the Caravan and Camping Club. Access to the land was the only service provided, and the arrival of two caravans was cause for excitement! Little attention was paid to the tourism business in early years because of the investment required by the agricultural side of the business, then the mainstay of the farm. Today, pitches are provided for members of the two clubs with a large proportion of their business coming from repeat bookings. The tourism enterprise is considered to be an integral part of the farm business. Not only does this present urban visitors with an opportunity to learn about farming practices, it also helps reduce the isolation of many farming families.

 

At Damage Barton, in recognition of the importance of personal interaction with guests, the family welcome all visitors personally. Visitors are involved with, and notified of, daily farming activities by way of notes recorded on a blackboard in the visitor centre which provides a means of farm interpretion.

A True Icon A Brief History of the VW Bus.

A True Icon A Brief History of the VW Bus.

By Matt Weston

Hipster playing guitar for his friends on a summers day

Hipster playing guitar for his friends on a summers day

Often characterized as the ‘Hippy’ transport of Woodstock and the 60’s generation, the VW bus has gone through a number of modifications and although the familiar front design of the Split-Screen is now long gone, the VW van lives on in it’s newest guise; the T5. Most who are familiar with the VW Beetle will know that the car was actually commissioned on orders from Adolf Hilter, to produce a cheap, reliable car for the ‘Volk’ (The People) – The original Type 2 (The official name given to the VW bus) was based on the same technology, although the first vans were not available commercially until 1949. Unveiled at the Geneva motor show, the vehicle was produced at the same factory, Wolfsberg, in Germany.

The initial idea of the VW type 2 had come from Ben Pon, a Dutch importer, who noticed that many of the motorized trolleys around the Wolfsberg factory were made from stripped down Beetle chassis and running gear. His sketches put the wheels in motion for a beetle-based van, which was noted to look like ‘a box on wheels’ – And so, the VW van was born.

By 1950, up to ten vehicles a day were being produced at the plant, and the basic design would remain the same for the next four decades. This first generation, known as the ‘Split Screen’ is the most popular (and by far the most expensive variation of the van today!) The Split was produced from 1950 to 1967.

The unique design of the VW bus meant that the rear seats could be removed in order to transport greater loads. Due to the design being simple and cheap to produce, VW were able to turn out approximately 90 different body combinations over the first few years. These included buses, pick-ups, fire engines, ambulances, beer wagons, refrigerated vans, milk floats, mobile butchers/bread vans, delivery vans and of course, the well loved utility camper.

With 1951 came the introduction of the ‘Westfalia’; it’s name coming from Westfalia-Werke, the contractor commissioned for building the interior conversion, located in the Westphalia region of Germany. This variation proved popular, with many features added, including a longer dashboard with radio and clock, and chrome body trim. When the VW Camper was released in the USA in the mid 1950’s it was remarkably successful, with over 150,000 sold by 1963! By 1952, single cab pick-up variations were made available, with an engine sizes increasing by 1954. Production of the VW bus was then moved from Wolfsburg to Hannover, and by 1960 the wide-bed pick-up trucks became available on special order and the high roof delivery van was also produced. Flashing indicators (Front and rear) also replaced the somewhat erratic semaphores! By 1963, engine sizes increased to 1500cc from 1200cc, and sliding doors were made available as an option. This year also sadly marked the end of the Split, with an estimated 1,477,330 buses sold and in circulation. The Split was replaced in 1968 by the ‘Bay Window’. This new bus was based on a radical rethink of the vehicle as a whole, with suspension changes and a one-piece windscreen. Wind down windows were also added (A nice added extra at the time!) Although this was still a VW bus, this version had been changed both mechanically and visually. In 1973, the design of the Bay was changed again, with larger bumpers added, larger indicators (Forced on VW by the American market). Larger engines were also made available; 1600cc, 1700cc, 1800cc – reliability and ‘drivability’ was now better than ever.

1979 saw the last bay produced for the UK and European markets. A variation of the Bay Window was produced in Brazil (Along with the VW Beetle) until only as few years ago; although the latter had lost its air-cooled engine, to be replaced with a water-cooled lump (based loosely on the 1.4 VW Golf engine) The T25 van (Or the ‘wedge’ as it came to be known) was available from 1980, keeping a 2.0 litre air cooled until until 1983, when water-cooled engines became the standard across the range (The latter suffering somewhat with head gasket problems) The T25, again, was a completely redesigned vehicle with a more ‘square’ shape all together, proving as popular as it’s predecessors. ‘T4’s’ were produced over the following years, and the subsequent, current model, the ‘T5’ is continuing the massive success the of the VW camper. The most common models seen around the coasts of Devon these days are by far, the T25 and the T4 – both being the more affordable and reliable options. The VW Bus has been one of the most popular vehicles of the last few decades, and for whatever reason has become a massive part of the surfing community across the world. So, the next time you walk past that battered van parked up on the sea front, with it’s slightly shabby arches, dinked bumper and driver’s door sporting a different colour to the rest of the van, try to remember this machine’s proud heritage and the legacy it has given to millions the world over.

Woolacombe & Mortehoe Campsites

Barn ParkOLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

http://www.barnparkcamping.webs.com

01271 870421 / 07909547907

Barn Park is a small, quiet, family campsite on a working dairy farm (approximately 15 pitches). The village of Woolacombe with its’ award winning beach, is only a 5 minute drive away (1.5miles). The Site offers clean, basic facilities, a toilet block and a shower room. There is also a drinking water tap, and ‘al fresco’ washing up sink!

Barn Park is in a peaceful location, with stunning panoramic rural views over the North Devon countryside towards Dartmoor. We welcome families and couples,well behaved dogs (with responsible owners) are welcome too! We do not cater for groups or single sex parties.

 

Damage Barton

http://www.damafebarton.co.uk

01271 870 502DamageBarton

Damage Barton Caravan and Camping Site offers peaceful, spacious pitches with panoramic sea views, immaculate facilities, including 2 heated shower blocks, washing up areas, disabled/family bathrooms, shop open daily. Run by the Lethbridge Family since 1962 it is set on their 600 acre working farm situated on the North Devon coast in an AONB. An extensive network of footpaths lead directly from the site for visitors to enjoy the SW coastal path, abundant birdlife, magnificent wildflowers, and is just 2 miles from Woolacombe’s beautiful beach for surfing and watersports.  A great base to explore North Devon and Exmoor.

 

Little Roadway Farm

http://www.littleroadway.co.ukimage

01271 870 313.

Little Roadway Farm Campsite in Woolacombe is a long established family-run, family-friendly campsite nestled on the edge of the beautiful North Devon coast, within 15 acres of picturesque countryside.

We have been providing quality camping holidays in Woolacombe for over 20 years and take pride in the personalised quality of service we provide to all our guests. We as a family are keen and experienced campers and we understand how important it is to stay at a quiet, friendly, reliable campsite with good facilities and caring staff that look after your every requirement.

We endeavour to make sure every guest at our campsite has an enjoyable and memorable stay and returns home feeling relaxed and refreshed We also hire out bell tents of various sizes, and have a private field for rally’s, weddings, birthdays.

 

North Morte Farm

http://www.northmortefarm.co.uk10524913_836109779785803_146629490_n

01271 870 381

North Morte Farm is a Family run caravan and camping park, adjoining National Trust land, is only 500 yards from Rockham Beach and is set in some of the most spectacular countryside in the south-west. We have direct access to the south-west coast path and are only 5 minutes walk from the village of Mortehoe with pubs, shops, Post Office and restaurants.

North Morte provides all the facilities that you need for your holiday. The park has a modern toilet block, with a disabled shower, privacy cubicles, hairdryers, baby changing facilities and dishwashing, plus a laundry room. Children will love the play areas and there is a well-stocked shop.

 

Warcombe Farm

http://www.warcombefarm.co.ukjuly 2014 034

01271 870 690

Warcombe Farm is a five pennant family run touring holiday park. Beautiful sea views, easy access to excellent walking and cycle paths including the coastal path, outstanding facilities, children’s play area and a well stocked private fishing lake. We also have a well stocked shop with fresh bread and pastries and a large selection of homemade cakes and cream teas.

 

Woolacombe Bay Holiday Parks

http://www.woolacombe.comMotorhome at Twitchen

01271 870 343

Golden Coast, Woolacombe Bay, Twitchen House and Easewell Farm all combine scenic beauty with outstanding facilities and each has its own unique style and personality. Whatever the chosen Park, guests are free to take advantage of the facilities, activities and entertainment on all four. All Holiday Parks offer a superb selection of all-weather sea view camping and touring pitches with immaculate on-site facilities, entertainment day and night plus a wide range of fun filled activities for the whole family.

Pitches are spacious allowing plenty of room for tents or caravans, awnings, picnic furniture and vehicle. Super Pitches have TV aerial, water, drainage, electricity and night light. Shower rooms have under floor heating, individual cubicles, hairdryers, sauna, steam room, launderette, washing up and chemical disposal facilities. There is a Sports Complex featuring a Surfing Simulator, High Ropes Course, Climbing Wall and more. With over 40 FREE activities and pitches starting from only £6 per pitch per night Woolacombe Bay Holiday Parks is the perfect place to stay!

 

Woolacombe Sands

http://www.woolacombe-sands.co.ukSSP-2-1024x680

01271 870 569

We pride ourselves on being a third generation family run park, providing wonderful holidays for our guests who return year after year. We offer a great choice of accommodation to suit all budgets and requirements. With heated swimming pools, crazy golf, children’s play park, arcade and bowling, licensed clubhouse and food bar with great nightly children’s and adults entertainments and much more, we are the perfect choice

Camping with Children – downloadable games and activities.

Camping with children can be a wonderful holiday, getting back to basics and enjoying the great outdoors can be both fun and educational for children, as well as providing a cost effective holiday.

Camping can be a great adventure, children can appreciate the birds, animals, trees and wildlife that may go unnoticed on other holidays. It is also a great way to play with other children, make friends and experience new things.

The key to a successful camping trip with children is planning and this is something that can be done as a whole family, to gain their excitement and build anticipation for their forthcoming adventure, you could even do a trial run in the garden putting up the tent and learning to cook outdoors.

 

In Issue 1 of our magazine we have a guide to some of the local Woolacombe & Mortehoe campsites and all that they can offer you for your holiday.

If you decide to give camping a go, or are a veteran camper, we would love to see some of your photos on our readers gallery, or read about you’re camping highlights, hints and tips. Get in touch woolacombemortehoevoice@gmail.com

 

Games to Play with Children while Camping

Being outside can be an adventure in itself for children, but they are still prone to get bored at times, or need something to keep them occupied. We have developed a few games and ideas for you. Please feel free to download and print some of the following.

Scavenger Hunts 

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A scavenger hunt is a great way for the whole family to enjoy their surroundings while playing a game and being educated. Simply download and print one of the Scavenger Hunt lists, and start looking for the 20 items on each list, the aim is to find as many as possible on each list, the one who finds the most things is deemed the winner. If there are a large group of you doing this you could even have a first, second and third prize.

Beach Scavenger Hunt

Outdoor Scavenger Hunt

Bingo

Bingo is a great way to get to observe things around you. Each person has a bingo card, the person to cross off all the items on their card is the winner. If you want to make this into a shorter version, the winner could be deemed if they get all the items on one horizontal or vertical line.

Bingo Cards

Outdoor Arts & Crafts

Being outside in natures playground is a wonderful place to let children get to know their environment, and also a great way to spend some time together making new crafts from the things they find. We have listed a few of our ideas, but for many more wonderful craft and outdoor inspirations we think this is a wonderful website to look at before going away http://www.naturedetectives.org.uk/download/booklet_play.htm

Make a twig frame

Nature Mobile

Make your Nature Tree

If you have any ideas of things that you have done on a camping holiday with children, we would love to hear from you, perhaps you would like to send us a photograph, or write a short blog about your recommendations.